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Forum

Forum sessions will explore the 4 issues of global importance that have the most potential for breakthroughs in the next ten years, or are most in need of radical rethinking. These are our ‘moonshots’: challenges so large in both ambition and timeline that no one person, organisation, or country can really solve. The 2019 Ideas Abu Dhabi moonshots include The New World Order; The Brain; Cyber and The Future of Transport.

From New World Order to none? Evolution & crisis in global relations

After the fall of the Soviet Union, US President George H. W. Bush declared a ‘new world order’. Decades on and the system of international institutions and global relations that has defined the post-World War II era have remained intact but begun to fray. A fast-growing Asia and re-assertive Russia are pushing for change and exploring alternatives. Will the existing system limp along until a crisis forces it to adapt, or can it evolve to reflect new realities?

The Brain: Unfolding the mystery

The brain is the most complex structure in the known universe. Despite decades of research and millions of dollars we still have a limited understanding of how it truly works. Yet significant efforts are underway to revolutionise the way we understand, treat, and perhaps even enhance the brain. How far away are we from any real progress in curing brain diseases? What potential is there for upgrading our own cerebral hardware?

Cyber: The new battleground?

The exponential growth of Internet connectivity – from phones and homes to businesses and governments – has created tremendous advances in knowledge, commerce, and education. At the same time it poses new dangers to our personal and national security. High-profile cases have shown just how vulnerable our online lives have made us. Cyberattacks that lock out whole hospital systems in exchange for bitcoin. Hacks that see personal details for sale on the dark web. The culprits are no longer visible, scattered around the globe, often with opaque motivations. What can we do to make cyberspace a safer place?

Faster, Further for All: the future of transport

From self-driving cars and hyperloop to sub-orbital space travel, the world is about to shrink still further. With new modes of transport come new ways for us to live and work. But is this faster future really possible or desirable against a backdrop of urban congestion, climate change, and a rising population?

Forum sessions will explore the 4 issues of global importance that have the most potential for breakthroughs in the next ten years, or are most in need of radical rethinking. These are our ‘moonshots’: challenges so large in both ambition and timeline that no one person, organisation, or country can really solve. The 2019 Ideas Abu Dhabi moonshots include The New World Order; The Brain; Cyber and The Future of Transport.

World Order

From New World Order to none? Evolution & crisis in global relations

After the fall of the Soviet Union, US President George H. W. Bush declared a ‘new world order’. Decades on and the system of international institutions and global relations that has defined the post-World War II era have remained intact but begun to fray. A fast-growing Asia and re-assertive Russia are pushing for change and exploring alternatives. Will the existing system limp along until a crisis forces it to adapt, or can it evolve to reflect new realities?

The Brain

The Brain: Unfolding the mystery

The brain is the most complex structure in the known universe. Despite decades of research and millions of dollars we still have a limited understanding of how it truly works. Yet significant efforts are underway to revolutionise the way we understand, treat, and perhaps even enhance the brain. How far away are we from any real progress in curing brain diseases? What potential is there for upgrading our own cerebral hardware?

Cyber

Cyber: The new battleground?

The exponential growth of Internet connectivity – from phones and homes to businesses and governments – has created tremendous advances in knowledge, commerce, and education. At the same time it poses new dangers to our personal and national security. High-profile cases have shown just how vulnerable our online lives have made us. Cyberattacks that lock out whole hospital systems in exchange for bitcoin. Hacks that see personal details for sale on the dark web. The culprits are no longer visible, scattered around the globe, often with opaque motivations. What can we do to make cyberspace a safer place?

Future of Transport

Faster, Further for All: the future of transport

From self-driving cars and hyperloop to sub-orbital space travel, the world is about to shrink still further. With new modes of transport come new ways for us to live and work. But is this faster future really possible or desirable against a backdrop of urban congestion, climate change, and a rising population?